CES 2018: Medical technologies you need to know

Updated Jan. 16, 2018 Mobile health devices and wearables have increasingly played a prominent role at the annual CES show in Las Vegas. Health and medical devices touted at CES 2018 sought to improve everything from heart health to posture. Here are 13 companies that exhibited digital health solutions at this year’s show. Next >>

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Sensirion unveils new RH/T sensor module

Sensirion will tout its CO2 and RH/T sensor module SCD30 that is designed to sense humidity, temperature and carbon dioxide concentration at AHR Expo 2018. The AHR Expo is set to take place in Chicago, Jan. 22-24. The sensor features CMOSense Technology for IR detection to accurately measure carbon dioxide levels through a dual-channel principle.

How startup Nanowear partnered with Secant: It took a year and a lot of meetings

Nanowear, which creates cloth-based diagnostic monitoring nanosensor technology, has entered into an exclusive, worldwide supply-chain partnership agreement with The Secant Group for scaled manufacturing and production of its medical-grade cloth-based nanosensor technology. Under the agreement, Nanowear and The Secant Group will have the collective obligation for marketing the technology and associated products. Nanowear received FDA 510(k) clearance for its remote congestive heart

How smartphones can remotely monitor chemotherapy patients

University of Pittsburgh research has recently shown that smartphone sensors coupled with a specifically-developed algorithm could detect worsening symptoms in chemotherapy patients. The sensors offer a way for cancer patients to be remotely monitored. The sensors and algorithm can detect objective changes in patient behavior to determine if symptoms are getting worse. Indications of worsening

3D printed organ models are getting way better: Here’s how

University of Minnesota researchers are taking 3D printed organ models to the next level: They look and feel like the real thing, and integrated sensors help surgeons train. There’s even the potential that such artificial models may someday become the real deal – “bionic organs” used to replace damaged biological organs. The Minnesota researchers published

This manufacturing method can create flexible wearable electronics

Wearable electronics are useful in measuring vitals and activity, but usually aren’t fit to flex with the body. Harvard researchers have come up with a flexible solution using 3D printing. The human skin flexes and stretches to match how our bodies move. Anything worn tight on the skin needs to be made of a flexible

FDA approves first pill with sensor to track ingestion

The FDA today approved Abilify MyCite, the first drug in the U.S. to have an ingestible sensor embedded within the pill that can track if the medication was taken. The drug-device combination product is indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia, acute treatment of manic and mixed episodes linked with bipolar I disorder and as an […]

Sensirion touting flow and pressure sensors at MD&M Minneapolis

Sensirion is touting its new and enhanced sensor solutions for measuring humidity and temperature, gas and liquid flow and differential pressure at MD&M Minneapolis this year. The company’s LD20 series sensors use liquid flow sensing technology in a single-use design that can be used for high volume applications in a variety of medical applications. The

Sensirion completes development of single-use liquid flow sensor

Sensirion has announced that product development for its single-use liquid flow sensor LD20 has been completed and is ready for production. The flow sensor is designed to quickly and precisely measure the lowest flow rates and has already received a number of international awards. The sensor is compact and cost-effective and can be used for

Sensirion gas sensors now available globally

Sensirion’s multi-pixel gas sensor has recently gone global. The siloxane-resistant SGP multi-pixel gas sensor is available worldwide through the company’s distribution network. The SGP gas sensor features long-term stability and multi-pixel technology that can be used for environmental monitoring. Other metal-oxide gas sensors have poor long-term stability because of their irreversible contamination by siloxanes. The

This sweat-powered biofuel cell could create better wearable devices

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have created a stretchable sweat-powered biofuel cell, and it could enable better wearables. The biofuel cells use energy from sweat to generate 10 times more power per surface area than other biofuel cells that are used in wearables. The researchers claim it could be used to

Study: artificial ‘skin’ could improve robot sensing

Researchers have found a material that can mimic human skin and improve robots’ sensing capabilities. Usually rigid semiconductor materials that create robots’ circuits limit the machines’ movement or sensing, either because they are not flexible or don’t permit electrons to flow efficiently. But the rubber electronics and sensors tested by a University of Houston team…

Wearable sensor developer MC10 raises $9.2m

MC10, a Lexington, Mass.–based wearable sensor developer, raised $9.2 million in an offering of promissory notes and warrants convertible into preferred stock to 18 investors, according to regulatory filing. The flexible electronics company still needs to raise $767,038 to reach the offering’s $10 million total. MC10’s BioStamp wearable sensors collect and transmit biometric data, allowing

4 questions to ask when the mold will not fill right

A pressure sensor can be a big help when your mold isn’t filling properly. Here are four questions to ask when shopping for the right sensor. Shane VandeKerkhof, RJG Some molding problems can be diagnosed with a little pressure data from inside the mold. But whether you’re new to molding or a seasoned veteran trying to

These fabric-based sensors move with the body

Researchers have designed a new silicone-fabric sensor that can move with the human body and be used in wearables and robotics, according to research from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). Typical sensors that are used on wearables like heart