Cambridge Medical Robotics unveils first look at Versius ‘bot

Cambridge Medical Robotics released the first photos today of its surgical robot, Versius, designed to make minimal access surgery more widely available and easier to perform. “We’ve designed Versius with surgeons in mind. By equipping them with a remarkable tool, fit for their demanding job, we can change the way surgery is delivered,” CEO Martin…

Orthopedic implant coatings: This webinar will explore their application and development – Oct. 3

Tuesday, October 3, 2017 11:30am EST / 8:30am PST This webinar will explore the different types of orthopedic coatings and their typical applications. What are the benefits and limitations of each and when would you choose one over the other? We will also discuss why orthopedic coatings are used and new coating technologies under development.

Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 25, 2017

From InspireMD’s Swiss distribution deal to CoreLink’s stackable guide wire launch, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. InspireMD announces Swiss distribution deal InspireMD announced in an Aug. 25 press release that it has signed an agreement with 1a Medical to distribute the CGuard EPS (Embolic

Soft, water-powered robot makes endoscopic surgery easier

Harvard researchers have created a rigid-soft robotic arm for endoscopes that can sense, flex and has multiple degrees of freedom. Flexible endoscopes fit through narrow passages to reach difficult parts of the body. Once they reach their target, the devices need rigid surgical tools to be able to manipulate or remove tissues. Researchers from Harvard’s

Medtech stories we missed this week: Aug. 18, 2017

From Nemaura’s new Oceania distribution deal to Sanuwave’s promissory note expansion, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Nemaura inks Oceania distribution deal for SugarBeat patch Nemaura announced in an Aug. 15 press release that it has signed a non-binding distribution deal with Device Technologies for

FDA approves pivotal study of Vascular Dynamics MobiusHD high blood pressure device

Vascular Dynamics said today that the FDA approved an investigational device exemption for a clinical trial of its MobiusHD device for treating resistant hypertension. MobiusHD is designed to help regulate blood pressure using electrodes implanted in the carotid artery to stimulate baroreceptors there. Mountain View, Calif.–based Vascular Dynamics said the 300-patient Calm 2 study is designed

How Consensus Orthopedics added smarts to orthopedic devices

Consensus Orthopedics made headlines with its TracPatch this year. So how did an ortho company get a digital product to market? Let’s face it, orthopedic devices are dumb. That is to say, they are mute. Silent. And in today’s healthcare environment, the silent kind of dumb is dangerous. Consensus Orthopedics (El Dorado Hills, Calif.) wanted to

Abbott’s new contact ablation catheter: Here’s what you need to know

The new TactiCath contact ablation catheter unites EndoSense and St. Jude Medical technologies that Abbott acquired, marrying fiber optics, flexibility and 3D mapping. If you want your grilled cheese to cook faster, you press it into the pan with your spatula. That’s contact force, the principle behind Abbott’s TactiCath contact force ablation catheter, according to

Magnetic fields can destroy biofilms on implants: Here’s how

Alternating magnetic fields may be the key to fighting bacteria that grows on artificial joints, according to new research from the University of Texas Southwestern. Researchers at UT Southwestern claim that short exposure to high-frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMF) has the potential to destroy bacteria that ends up in biofilms growing on the surface of

How a common hospital tool predicts poor outcomes after liver transplants

A frequently used tool in the hospital can be an indicator of which liver transplant recipients will do poorly after surgery, according to new research from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Led by Vinay Sundaram, a team of researchers found that the nursing assessment called the Braden Scale could be put to use in liver transplant patients

Lab-engineered tissue is creating new digestive tract treatments

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have reported success with lab-engineered tissue replacements to treat digestive system diseases. The research team demonstrated the effectiveness of growing anal sphincters in a lab to treat an animal model for fecal incontinence. The success comes after the researchers reported success in implanting human-engineered intestines in rodents. “Results from both

This 3D printed implant replaces skull bone

A New Jersey doctor turned to Johnson & Johnson’s DePuy Synthes and a 3D printed implant to replace missing skull bone in a patient. The procedure was performed after the patient suffered brain swelling and the skull became infected. Dr. Gaurav Gupta, assistant professor of neurosurgery at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, had to

Could crystal-based electronics enable medtech innovation?

New crystal-based electronics – in which a laser etches electronic circuitry into a crystal – could enable better electrical interfaces between implantable medical devices and biological tissue, according to the lead researcher behind the technology. “Electrical conductivity affects how cells adhere to a substrate. By optically defining highly conductive regions on the crystal, cells could

Electrical fields can heal brain damage: Here’s how

Electrical fields can guide neural stem cells into a specific location to repair brain damage, according to new research from the University of California at Davis. Min Zhao, a researcher at UC Davis, studies how electric fields can guide wound healing. His previous research has shown that electric fields are able to attract cells into

How slugs are creating better medical adhesives

Slug mucus is the inspiration behind a new adhesive to close surgical wounds and reduce the use of surgical staples, according to new research out of Harvard. Some of the current adhesives on the market can be toxic and stick together tissues weakly. Some can’t be used in wet environments altogether, which can pose a