Ultrasound imaging and blood tests could catch liver cancer in early stages

Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern have recently discovered that combining ultrasound images with blood tests that test for high alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels can improve detection of early-stage liver cancer by 40%. There are about 42,220 new liver cancer diagnoses and about 30,200 will die from it per year. It affects more men

17 black innovators who made medtech better

From cardiology to endoscopy to blood transfusion, African Americans have played an important role as innovators in the history of medicine and medtech. To help mark African American History Month, here’s a look at some of their greatest achievements. Here are 17 black innovators who have made discoveries and invented devices to make medtech better.

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This remote-controlled immunotherapy system targets and kills cancer cells

University of California researchers have developed a remote-controlled therapy system that identifies and kills cancer cells using ultrasound. The ultrasound-based system is able to non-invasively and remotely control the genetic process in immune T cells to identify and kill cancer cells. According to the researchers, the ability to non-invasively and remotely manipulate cells at a

How modern medicine changed ancient antidotes

Modern medicine is revolutionary in comparison to how different diseases and disorders were treated in ancient times. Without regulation, its no surprise that methods like drilling a hole in the skull to relieve a headache and using enemas to treat asthma were normal practice. With the FDA’s founding in 1906, many devices and practices have

Electric currents could create new cancer therapies

Researchers in Switzerland and Taiwan are using electric currents to map the distribution of biomolecules in cancer cells to give doctors a better understanding of which therapies would be most effective for treating cancer. Traditionally, fluorescent markers are used to gather spatial information about cancer cells to targeted therapies. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and

The top 10 medical disruptors of 2018

Each year the Cleveland Clinic determines what the top 10 disruptors in healthcare will be for the following year. The criteria to be considered a disruptor is that it has to be so innovative that it could change healthcare in a significant way in the next year. Approximately 150 to 200 Cleveland Clinic physicians from

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Artificial intelligence could prevent breast cancer false positives: Here’s how

Artificial intelligence could improve detection and diagnosis of breast cancer and eliminate false positives, according to new research out of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). A team of researchers from MIT’s CSAIL, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School developed an AI system with machine learning that can

How targeting a gene mutation could treat aggressive lung cancer

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found a gene mutation that could help treat an aggressive form of lung cancer that is known to be “undruggable.” Gene mutations in the KEAP1 gene could help treat mutations in the KRAS gene that causes certain lung cancer types to be undruggable. KEAP1 mutations occur with

IBM finds new ways to trigger immune system

Researchers at IBM have figured out how to trigger a response from the immune system using polymer-coated graphene sheets. The technique involves attaching drug molecules directly to a nanomaterial like graphene sheets to create nanotherapies that could help treat tumors. Nanotherapies transport drugs directly to tumors for cancer treatment. “We’ve essentially uncovered a new way

10 innovative diagnostic tests to combat diseases

This is an exciting time for medical diagnostics, with recent innovations allowing for faster disease diagnosis than ever before. From cancer to diabetes to heart disease, here are 10 diagnostic tests that could change the game when it comes to catching diseases earlier. Next >> [Want to stay more on top of MDO content? Subscribe to our

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This molecule stops pancreatic cancer cells from spreading

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center scientists have identified molecules that could be the next therapeutic solution for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal forms of cancer. About 53,670 people are expected to be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year with 43,090 dying from it, according to the American Cancer Society. The

This is not a test: RMAT designation goes live

By: Peter Marks, M.D., Ph.D. The field of regenerative medicine encompasses a wide scope of innovative products including cell therapies, therapeutic tissue engineering products, human cell and tissue products, and certain combination products using such therapies. Examples include genetically-modified cellular therapies, such as chimeric antigen receptor T-cells (CAR-T cells) and human tissues grown on scaffolds

Genetically engineered T-cells treat leukemia in babies

Researchers in London have successfully treated leukemia in two babies, in what they are touting as the world’s first treatment of cancer using genetically engineered immune cells from donors. Doctors treated two British infants, 11 and 16 months old, using Cellectis’s CAR T-cell product, UCART19, which is an allogeneic CAR T-cell product candidate for the

How nanodiscs could eliminate cancer cells

University of Michigan researchers have successfully developed a cancer vaccine that fights to eliminate colon and melanoma cancer cells and prevent tumor growth in mice. Nanodiscs loaded with tumor neoantigens deliver a customized therapeutic vaccine targeting cancer mutations. The neoantigens are unique mutations found in tumor cells, and the technology of the nanodiscs recognizes the

CytoSorbents gains on German reimbursement win

CytoSorbents Corp. (NSDQ:CTSO) shares jumped 9% to $5.35 apiece today after the company reported that it landed a permanent reimbursement procedure code for its CytoSorb therapy in Germany. The Monmouth Junction, N.J.-based company developed its blood purification therapy to treat inflammation in critically-ill patients and for use during cardiac surgery. CytoSorb is an extracorporeal cytokine