These nanosponges remove sepsis-causing bacteria from the bloodstream

California researchers have created a nanosponge that is designed to absorb and remove molecules that are known to cause sepsis. Researchers from the University of California at San Diego created macrophage nanosponges that are wrapped in the cell membranes of macrophages and can safely absorb and remove sepsis-causing molecules from the bloodstream. So far, the

Secant Group officials think they’ve cracked vascular regeneration: Here’s how

Secant Group today announced what it described as game-changing technology to advance vascular regeneration, solving problems that surgeons presently have when it comes to vascular harvesting and the non-resorbable synthetic graft compliance mismatching. The technology, which Secant (Telford, Pa.) developed in partnership with its sister company SanaVita Medical, involves a synthetic, small bore, vessel with a

3D printing and cryogenics could create new potential for artificial organs

Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a technique to replicate biological structures using cryogenics and 3D printing. The research is a first from the university to create structure that are soft enough to replicate the mechanical properties of organs like the brain and lungs. The 3D printing technique could create replica organs and assist

How medtech could stop the drug overdose crisis in the U.S.

The opioid epidemic is one of the deadliest problems facing the U.S. today. Through the development of new pain management devices, medtech could be a leader in solving the crisis. The prescription opioid overdose crisis in America didn’t start until the late 1990s, when pharmaceutical companies touted prescription painkillers that weren’t supposed to be addictive.

Tiny hair-like fibers help create interconnections between brain regions

MIT researchers have used a single flexible fiber about the size of human hair to deliver optical, electrical and chemical signals back and forth into the brain to create an improved way of learning about the functions and interconnections of different brain regions. The fibers replicate the softness and flexibility of brain tissue which allows

How noninvasive brainwave technology improved PTSD in veterans

A noninvasive brainwave mirroring technology recently showed potential in reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in military personnel, according to a study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs reports that PTSD affects about 11-20% of Operations Iraqi Freedom and and Enduring Freedom veterans, 12% of Gulf War veterans and

Medical device companies: These 15 performed the best in 2017

Updated Jan. 5, 2018 Among the most successful medical device companies of 2017, there were two themes: innovation and breadth of services. That was the major takeaway of an MDO analysis of the stock performance of the 100 largest publicly traded medtech companies in the world. What does innovation mean? Think Align Technology (Nasdaq:ALGN) and

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These lab-grown blood vessel replacements could benefit dialysis patients

University of Minnesota researchers have developed a blood vessel replacement made of biological materials in a lab. The lab-grown vessels have no living cells at implantation and could be used as a graft for kidney dialysis patients. The lab-engineered blood vessel replacement is the first non synthetic, decellularized graft that is repopulated with cells using

What is the future of medtech in 2018?

Some of the largest medtech companies showed in 2017 that they are ready to grow through embrace of the new healthcare ecosystem. Medical device companies are putting greater emphasis on value-based arguments for their products and services. They’re putting more attention to clinical and economic research and adopting digital products that incorporate machine learning and

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Medtech stories we missed this week: Dec. 22, 2017

From Hepa Wash’s new collaboration to Stimwave’s FDA clearance, here are five medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Hepa Wash collaborates with GALS program Hepa Wash announced in a Dec. 7 press release that it has collaborated with the German Accelerator Life Sciences (GALS) program to expand its

How modern medicine changed ancient antidotes

Modern medicine is revolutionary in comparison to how different diseases and disorders were treated in ancient times. Without regulation, its no surprise that methods like drilling a hole in the skull to relieve a headache and using enemas to treat asthma were normal practice. With the FDA’s founding in 1906, many devices and practices have

This procedure repairs joint damage and avoids hip replacement surgery

The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center is using a new procedure to help patients avoid hip replacement surgery while still repairing their hip. The procedure, called Subchondroplasty, involves injected a bone substitute material into the hip joint. The material helps fill voids or lesions in the joint. “We want to preserve the native hip whenever

Electric currents could create new cancer therapies

Researchers in Switzerland and Taiwan are using electric currents to map the distribution of biomolecules in cancer cells to give doctors a better understanding of which therapies would be most effective for treating cancer. Traditionally, fluorescent markers are used to gather spatial information about cancer cells to targeted therapies. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and

7 medical devices combating the opioid crisis

Opioid-related deaths have become an epidemic in the U.S., garnering attention from the White House, the FDA and many other governmental bodies. From 2000 to 2014, nearly half a million Americans died from drug overdoses. In 2015, more than 50,000 people died from drug overdoses, and 33,000 were opioid-related. Prescription overdoses continue to cause more

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How Smith & Nephew’s InVentures program is promoting innovation

For nearly a decade, Smith & Nephew’s InVentures program has worked with surgeons who have innovative ideas but aren’t starting their own companies. The program provides a third innovation route on top of the major two for big medical device companies: internal R&D and acquisition of smaller companies with new technologies. “A company the size of Smith