17 black innovators who made medtech better

From cardiology to endoscopy to blood transfusion, African Americans have played an important role as innovators in the history of medicine and medtech. To help mark African American History Month, here’s a look at some of their greatest achievements. Here are 17 black innovators who have made discoveries and invented devices to make medtech better.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

These medtech companies raised the most VC last year

Perhaps there’s a ray of hope that venture capital funding is recovering a bit for the medical device industry. VC firms invested more than $2.8 billion in 2017, an increase of more than $647 million from 2016, according to the MoneyTree Report from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and CB Insights. There were a total 229 deals involving

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

These nanosponges remove sepsis-causing bacteria from the bloodstream

California researchers have created a nanosponge that is designed to absorb and remove molecules that are known to cause sepsis. Researchers from the University of California at San Diego created macrophage nanosponges that are wrapped in the cell membranes of macrophages and can safely absorb and remove sepsis-causing molecules from the bloodstream. So far, the

How noninvasive brainwave technology improved PTSD in veterans

A noninvasive brainwave mirroring technology recently showed potential in reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in military personnel, according to a study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs reports that PTSD affects about 11-20% of Operations Iraqi Freedom and and Enduring Freedom veterans, 12% of Gulf War veterans and

How smartphones can remotely monitor chemotherapy patients

University of Pittsburgh research has recently shown that smartphone sensors coupled with a specifically-developed algorithm could detect worsening symptoms in chemotherapy patients. The sensors offer a way for cancer patients to be remotely monitored. The sensors and algorithm can detect objective changes in patient behavior to determine if symptoms are getting worse. Indications of worsening

How modern medicine changed ancient antidotes

Modern medicine is revolutionary in comparison to how different diseases and disorders were treated in ancient times. Without regulation, its no surprise that methods like drilling a hole in the skull to relieve a headache and using enemas to treat asthma were normal practice. With the FDA’s founding in 1906, many devices and practices have

This procedure repairs joint damage and avoids hip replacement surgery

The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center is using a new procedure to help patients avoid hip replacement surgery while still repairing their hip. The procedure, called Subchondroplasty, involves injected a bone substitute material into the hip joint. The material helps fill voids or lesions in the joint. “We want to preserve the native hip whenever

Electric currents could create new cancer therapies

Researchers in Switzerland and Taiwan are using electric currents to map the distribution of biomolecules in cancer cells to give doctors a better understanding of which therapies would be most effective for treating cancer. Traditionally, fluorescent markers are used to gather spatial information about cancer cells to targeted therapies. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and

These artificial heart muscle patches can repair dead heart muscles

A team of biomedical engineers have developed a fully functioning artificial human heart muscle that can be used as a patch to repair dead heart muscle. Duke University biomedical engineers developed the patch to be used in human patients who have previously suffered a heart attack. “Right now, virtually all existing therapies are aimed at

Medtech stories we missed this week: Dec. 8, 2017

From Minimus Spine’s European distribution deal to Stimwave receiving FDA clearance, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Minimus Spine inks EU distribution deal Minimus Spine announced in a Dec. 4 press releasethat it has signed its first European distribution deal with Italian company Moss and

Medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017

From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics.

Philips unveils new image-guided therapies and diagnostic devices

Philips is showcasing some of its recently expanded image-guided therapies at the annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) event in Denver this year. The company is touting its advanced interventional imaging systems, diagnostic and therapeutic devices, planning and navigation software and various services. It is also showcasing its latest cardiac care solutions for ultrasound and image-guided

These 7 antique medical devices will make you shudder

It’s a good thing we live in the times of modern medicine. Historically, medical devices have been scary and unorthodox – and sometimes amounted to downright quackery. Surprisingly, a lot of these devices were thought to be useful in their era, long before the U.S. FDA started preapproving devices (which wasn’t until the 1970s). You

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Patient with complete spinal cord injury regains voluntary motor function

Patients who have lost mobility in their legs due to complete spinal cord injury could soon regain lost motor function below the level of injury, thanks to new research out of the University of Louisville. Motor function was recovered after study participants received long-term activity-based training and spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES). After approximately 34.5

The top 10 medical disruptors of 2018

Each year the Cleveland Clinic determines what the top 10 disruptors in healthcare will be for the following year. The criteria to be considered a disruptor is that it has to be so innovative that it could change healthcare in a significant way in the next year. Approximately 150 to 200 Cleveland Clinic physicians from

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11